Cisco: IoT to generate $8 trillion worldwide in 10 years – Computer Business Review


Cisco: IoT to generate $8 trillion worldwide in 10 years – Computer Business Review.

 

Add this to the Trillions made on personal analytics over the same time and the Quaudrillions made over expanded capitalism and also the ginormous amounts of wealth created via cannabis legalisation globally – The ‘poor’ might just be able to finally pay their way and fulfill their dreams without having to ask for money from someone else first… fingers crossed

SpeechTechMag.com: MotionSavvy’s UNI Converts Sign Language to Audio


SpeechTechMag.com: MotionSavvy’s UNI Converts Sign Language to Audio.

For most hearing impaired people, the inability to properly and precisely communicate with the hearing often leads to frustration, anger, and isolation. Unless a hearing person knows sign language, which is unlikely, the deaf are forced to communicate by pen and paper using a sort of pigeon English.

However, with the advancement of speech and other technologies, several solutions aiming to lower the communication barrier are hitting the market. Considering that there are roughly 250 million deaf people in the world, according to the World Health Organization, this is indeed welcome news.

MotionSavvy, a startup from Alameda, Calif., has just taken the wraps off UNI, an assistive device that features a tablet, smart case, and mobile app. Using gesture and speech recognition, sign language is converted to audio, and spoken word is translated to text in real time without needing a Web connection.

“Every aspect of interaction with a hearing person is difficult, to the point that we feel hopeless,” said Ryan Hait-Campbell, CEO and co-founder of MotionSavvy, in an email. “We feel so hopeless that there is nothing that can be done. We are trying to give deaf people the ability to live the life that they want without any limits.”

http://www.motionsavvy.com/

WAITING FOR A PIP ASSESSMENT FROM CAPITA – BEWARE


WAITING FOR A PIP ASSESSMENT FROM CAPITA – BEWARE.

http://jaynelinney.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/waiting-for-a-pip-assessment-from-capita-beware/

On Wednesday at around 1.pm,  I received a phone call from a woman informing me she was coming to assess me at home that day at 2.30.pm – It turned out she was from Capita.

I refused, explaining I’d had no notice of the appointment and I wasn’t prepared, after her attempts to persuade me to go along with the visit failed, I immediately phoned Capita. The woman I spoke with there stated a letter about this appointment had been sent on September 6 – I’m still waiting.

The assessment has been rearranged for October and a letter is on its way, but…as the only mail I’ve received from Capita took 2 weeks+ to arrive – I’m not holding my breathe.

I immediately posted this up in Facebook and have received several comments saying others had had similar experiences, below is one example

“i had nurse just turn up at my door wanting to do mine,no letter or phone call,was sent away with a flea in her ear,by my carer,was rearranged and on the day,they tried to move appointment forward two hours with out asking,wouldn’t see them til arranged time,its all a game to them,but they cannot treat sick people this way, hope your assessment goes ok,when you do have itx”

The messages I have are beginning to form a pattern, it appears it is not uncommon for Capita to turn up on your doorstep without warning, to carry out a PIP assessment.

If this happens to you or someone you know, I suggest you do as we have, refuse to let them in and insist they follow their procedure which states:

You will receive a letter with an appointment for a face to face consultation or  member of our booking team may contact you by phone to arrange this with you.  (their emphasis)

I was hoping Capita weren’t going to be another ATOS but…it seems the games are under way!

Please let me know if you experience a similar incident – I’m keeping an eye on this!

Bedroom Tax ‘tormented cancer victim to death’ when she was forced to move home despite illness – Mirror Online


Bedroom Tax ‘tormented cancer victim to death’ when she was forced to move home despite illness – Mirror Online.

News that the end of the despised Bedroom Tax was in sight on Friday came too late for cancer victim Jan Mandeville, reports the Sunday People.

The 52-year-old grandmother’s funeral was on Thursday.

And, according to her family, her death was hastened when she was forced to move home despite her fatal illness.

Jan – who also suffered depression and fibromyalgia, making even basic movement painful – could not afford the extra rent on the two-bed flat she loved so she had to switch to a smaller property that she hated.

Her online diary reveals how she was tormented by the Bedroom Tax as well as her anger at the politicians she blamed.

Last year, Jan told how she fell into rent arrears following the housing benefit reforms which forced her to move home that year.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/bedroom-tax-tormented-cancer-victim-4177135#ixzz3CdUvk1J5
Follow us: @DailyMirror on Twitter | DailyMirror on Facebook

via Bedroom Tax ‘tormented cancer victim to death’ when she was forced to move home despite illness – Mirror Online.

A citizen’s income of £71 a week per person would make Britain fairer The New Statesman BY LAUREN RAZAVI PUBLISHED 18 AUGUST, 2014


A citizen’s income of £71 a week per person would make Britain fairer

 

http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/2014/08/citizens-income-71-week-person-would-make-britain-fairer

With the potential to appease both the left and the right of the political spectrum, the citizen’s income concept could well mark the road to a fairer, more equal welfare system in Britain.

Universal income is a policy idea that has both left and right-wing credentials. Photo: Getty

What would you do with an extra £71 per week? That’s the question posed by The Citizen’s Income Trust, an organisation that promotes debate on the concept of a universal income for Britain, with citizenship as the only basis of entitlement.

The Trust proposes a radical reform of the national welfare system, suggesting the annual spend on benefits should be distributed equally among all citizens, regardless of their income or employment status. Under their proposals, 0-24 year olds would receive £56.25 per week, 25-64 year olds would receive £71 per week and those 65 and over would receive £142.70 per week.

Analysing figures from the 2012-13 financial year, the cost of such a scheme is projected at around £276bn per year – just £1bn more than the annual welfare budget that year –making the implementation of a citizen’s income close to revenue and cost neutral.

Disability and housing benefits would remain intact, but the scheme would replace all other benefits including child benefits, income support and jobseeker’s allowance, national insurance and state pensions. Included in the current annual spend figures is £8bn in Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) administration and £2bn in HMRC tax credit administration and write-offs.

A common objection to universal income is its potential to deter a population from working by creating a “money-for-nothing” culture. But in a 1970s pilot study called Mincome in Canada, establishing a citizen’s income didn’t produce a workshy population. In fact, the only people who stopped working or worked less were young mothers, teenagers in education and those due to retire soon.

Taking the Trust’s figures, it also appears unlikely that £3,692 per year would dissuade people from working or replace income from employment. Rather, it would prevent the poorest sections of society falling into dependency on state welfare and being discouraged from entering paid employment for fear of losing benefit entitlements. This welfare trap would be eliminated; a citizen’s income would be paid, tax-free, regardless of an individual’s working status or income level.

In this way, a citizen’s income has the potential to lead to a more equal and meritocratic society. Debates around reducing weekly working hours have been circulating for some time, and citizen’s income could aid this. For a person who currently works 40 hours per week at minimum wage, a £71 per week citizen’s income would facilitate a reduction of around 10 working hours.

A citizen’s income also helps compensate for people’s non-financial contributions in a society and culture such as caring for children or elderly parents, undertaking voluntary work or pursuing hobbies and creative interests. Given the safety net of a small guaranteed income, there’s more room for career changes, education and enterprise projects too.

With no need to prove entitlement in order to claim a citizen’s income, benefit fraud would be abolished and government bureaucracy reduced as the need for DWP administrators became significantly lower. No more invasive checks on an individual’s circumstances and no more stigmatisation of claimants; no need to spend money on chasing and punishing “benefit fraudsters”.

The Swiss are due to vote in a referendum on citizen’s income this year, while here in the UK, Green party leader Natalie Bennett has announced the policy will feature prominently in her party’s 2015 election manifesto. With the potential to appease both the left and the right of the political spectrum, the citizen’s income concept could well mark the road to a fairer, more equal welfare system in Britain.

Lauren Razavi tweets @LaurenRazavi